Hello

I have my drawings on the Internet
leseanthomas:

DWAYNE MCDUFFIE
(February 20, 1962 – February 21, 2011)
Dwayne McDuffie was born and raised in Detroit, Michigan, the son of Leroy McDuffie and Edna McDuffie Gardner. He attended The Roeper School and went on to the University of Michigan, graduating with a bachelor’s degree in English, then earning a master’s degree in physics. He then moved to New York to attend film school at New York University’s Tisch School of the Arts. While McDuffie was working as a copy editor at the business magazine Investment Dealers’ Digest, a friend got him an interview for an assistant editor position at Marvel Comics.
Going on staff at Marvel as editor Bob Budiansky’s assistant on special projects, McDuffie helped develop the company’s first superhero trading cards. He also scripted stories for Marvel. His first major work was Damage Control, a miniseries about the company that shows up between issues and tidies up the mess left by the latest round of superhero/supervillain battles. After becoming an editor at Marvel, McDuffie submitted a spoof proposal for a comic entitled Ninja Thrashers in response to Marvel’s treatment of its black characters. Becoming a freelancer in 1990, McDuffie wrote for dozens of various comics titles for Marvel, DC Comics, and Archie Comics. In addition, he wrote Monster in My Pocket for Harvey Comics editor Sid Jacobson, whom he cites on his website as having taught him everything he knows. In early 1991, he divorced his first wife, Patricia D. Younger, in Seminole County, Florida.
In the early 1990s, wanting to express a multicultural sensibility that he felt was missing in comic books, McDuffie and three partners founded Milestone Media, which The Plain Dealer of Cleveland, Ohio, described in 2000 as "the industry’s most successful minority-owned-and operated comic company." McDuffie explained:
"If you do a black character or a female character or an Asian character, then they aren’t just that character. They represent that race or that sex, and they can’t be interesting because everything they do has to represent an entire block of people. You know, Superman isn’t all white people and neither is Lex Luthor. We knew we had to present a range of characters within each ethnic group, which means that we couldn’t do just one book. We had to do a series of books and we had to present a view of the world that’s wider than the world we’ve seen before."
Milestone, whose characters include the African-American Static, Icon, and Hardware; the Asian-American Xombi, and the multi-ethnic superhero group the Blood Syndicate, which include black, Asian and Latino men and women, debuted its titles in 1993 through a distribution deal with DC Comics. Serving as editor-in-chief, McDuffie created or co-created many characters, including Static.
After Milestone had ceased publishing new comics, Static was developed into an animated series Static Shock. McDuffie was hired to write and story-edit on the series, writing 11 episodes.
His other television writing credits included Teen Titans and What’s New, Scooby-Doo?. McDuffie was hired as a staff writer for the animated series Justice League and was promoted to story editor and producer as the series became Justice League Unlimited. During the entire run of the animated series, McDuffie wrote, produced, or story-edited 69 out of the 91 episodes. McDuffie also wrote the story for the video game Justice League Heroes.
McDuffie was hired to help revamp and story-edit Cartoon Network’s popular animated Ben 10 franchise with Ben 10: Alien Force, continuing the adventures of the ten-year-old title character into his mid and late teenage years. During the run of the series, McDuffie wrote episodes 1–3, 14, 25–28, 45 and 46 and/or story-edited all forty-six episodes. McDuffie also produced and story edited for the second sequel series Ben 10: Ultimate Alien, which premiered April 23. 2010. He wrote episodes 1, 10, 11, 16, 30, 39 together with J. M. DeMatteis and 52.
McDuffie wrote a number of direct-to-DVD animated films featuring DC Comics characters - including Justice League: Crisis on Two Earths and Justice League: Doom. He scripted the direct-to-DVD adaptation of All-Star Superman, which was released one day after his death. Justice League: Doom was released posthumously in 2012. McDuffie’s work was also seen on Ben 10: Omniverse, having shared story by credit on the first two episodes, “The More Things Change, Parts 1 and 2.”
—————————————————
A pioneer who paved the way for increasing awareness and diversity within the mainstream comic book industry as well as animation, Dwayne’s memory and contribution will never be forgotten. Rest In Power, brother.

One of my heroes.

leseanthomas:

DWAYNE MCDUFFIE

(February 20, 1962 – February 21, 2011)

Dwayne McDuffie was born and raised in Detroit, Michigan, the son of Leroy McDuffie and Edna McDuffie Gardner. He attended The Roeper School and went on to the University of Michigan, graduating with a bachelor’s degree in English, then earning a master’s degree in physics. He then moved to New York to attend film school at New York University’s Tisch School of the Arts. While McDuffie was working as a copy editor at the business magazine Investment Dealers’ Digest, a friend got him an interview for an assistant editor position at Marvel Comics.

Going on staff at Marvel as editor Bob Budiansky’s assistant on special projects, McDuffie helped develop the company’s first superhero trading cards. He also scripted stories for Marvel. His first major work was Damage Control, a miniseries about the company that shows up between issues and tidies up the mess left by the latest round of superhero/supervillain battles.
After becoming an editor at Marvel, McDuffie submitted a spoof proposal for a comic entitled Ninja Thrashers in response to Marvel’s treatment of its black characters. Becoming a freelancer in 1990, McDuffie wrote for dozens of various comics titles for Marvel, DC Comics, and Archie Comics. In addition, he wrote Monster in My Pocket for Harvey Comics editor Sid Jacobson, whom he cites on his website as having taught him everything he knows. In early 1991, he divorced his first wife, Patricia D. Younger, in Seminole County, Florida.

In the early 1990s, wanting to express a multicultural sensibility that he felt was missing in comic books, McDuffie and three partners founded Milestone Media, which The Plain Dealer of Cleveland, Ohio, described in 2000 as "the industry’s most successful minority-owned-and operated comic company." McDuffie explained:

"If you do a black character or a female character or an Asian character, then they aren’t just that character. They represent that race or that sex, and they can’t be interesting because everything they do has to represent an entire block of people. You know, Superman isn’t all white people and neither is Lex Luthor. We knew we had to present a range of characters within each ethnic group, which means that we couldn’t do just one book. We had to do a series of books and we had to present a view of the world that’s wider than the world we’ve seen before."

Milestone, whose characters include the African-American Static, Icon, and Hardware; the Asian-American Xombi, and the multi-ethnic superhero group the Blood Syndicate, which include black, Asian and Latino men and women, debuted its titles in 1993 through a distribution deal with DC Comics. Serving as editor-in-chief, McDuffie created or co-created many characters, including Static.

After Milestone had ceased publishing new comics, Static was developed into an animated series Static Shock. McDuffie was hired to write and story-edit on the series, writing 11 episodes.

His other television writing credits included Teen Titans and What’s New, Scooby-Doo?.
McDuffie was hired as a staff writer for the animated series Justice League and was promoted to story editor and producer as the series became Justice League Unlimited. During the entire run of the animated series, McDuffie wrote, produced, or story-edited 69 out of the 91 episodes.
McDuffie also wrote the story for the video game Justice League Heroes.

McDuffie was hired to help revamp and story-edit Cartoon Network’s popular animated Ben 10 franchise with Ben 10: Alien Force, continuing the adventures of the ten-year-old title character into his mid and late teenage years. During the run of the series, McDuffie wrote episodes 1–3, 14, 25–28, 45 and 46 and/or story-edited all forty-six episodes. McDuffie also produced and story edited for the second sequel series Ben 10: Ultimate Alien, which premiered April 23. 2010. He wrote episodes 1, 10, 11, 16, 30, 39 together with J. M. DeMatteis and 52.

McDuffie wrote a number of direct-to-DVD animated films featuring DC Comics characters - including Justice League: Crisis on Two Earths and Justice League: Doom. He scripted the direct-to-DVD adaptation of All-Star Superman, which was released one day after his death. Justice League: Doom was released posthumously in 2012.
McDuffie’s work was also seen on Ben 10: Omniverse, having shared story by credit on the first two episodes, “The More Things Change, Parts 1 and 2.”

—————————————————

A pioneer who paved the way for increasing awareness and diversity within the mainstream comic book industry as well as animation, Dwayne’s memory and contribution will never be forgotten. Rest In Power, brother.

One of my heroes.

(via koltreg)

buttpoems:

Happy Hourly Comics Day!

My sweet fiancé’s first hourly comics day! So proud. So proud!!!

Happy Hourly Comics Day!

Weeee

fat-crystal-witch asked: Hey Madeleine, this is not really art related, so I hope you don't mind! But I'm pretty sure you live in Portland, OR? I'm visiting there with my brother at the end of next month, and was wondering about some neat places to check out, restaurants, art spaces, pretty much anything you like to do over there. Sorry if this is annoying. Feel free to ignore the ask if it is!

I live downtown so all of my favourite things are pretty much just within walking distance of each other- here they are:

Floating World Comics

Powell’s Books

Yama Sushi

Cargo

Portland Art Museum

Nong’s Khao Man Gai - THIS IS THE BEST FOOD I THINK I’M GONNA GO OUT AND GET SOME RIGHT NOW BECAUSE I’M HUNGRY AND IT IS SO GOOD.

Buffalo Exchange

Everyday Music

Pony Club Gallery

Lan Su Chinese Garden - this is more fun when it’s warm because it’s nice to sit outside and draw all the pretty flora- the tea is super nice though!

Portland Japanese Garden- this isn’t downtown but it’s soooooo pretty- they have neat art exhibits and festivals

If you’re in town for the first thursday of the month you’ll get to experience First Thursdays- all the art galleries are open and have free booze! It’s fun to wander around the city and pop into places and discover new art!

emmyc:

madeleineishere:

emmyc:

hayoubi:

drawbrandondraw:

hayoubi:

portrait of the artist on a thursday morning



GO BACK TO OHIO BRANDON. SO I CAN TURN THIS OFFICE INTO MY NAPPING CHAMBER

hehehheh chuuumps. I bet you’re wearing SHOES right now like IDIOTS. *works from home*


lucky storyboard kids- i’m in writer meetings all day


Oh, Maddy, do you want to borrow a cup of sparkles? I have tons!


yes.good.

emmyc:

madeleineishere:

emmyc:

hayoubi:

drawbrandondraw:

hayoubi:

portrait of the artist on a thursday morning

GO BACK TO OHIO BRANDON. SO I CAN TURN THIS OFFICE INTO MY NAPPING CHAMBER

hehehheh chuuumps. I bet you’re wearing SHOES right now like IDIOTS. *works from home*

lucky storyboard kids- i’m in writer meetings all day

Oh, Maddy, do you want to borrow a cup of sparkles? I have tons!

yes.good.

emmyc:

hayoubi:

drawbrandondraw:

hayoubi:

portrait of the artist on a thursday morning



GO BACK TO OHIO BRANDON. SO I CAN TURN THIS OFFICE INTO MY NAPPING CHAMBER

hehehheh chuuumps. I bet you’re wearing SHOES right now like IDIOTS. *works from home*


lucky storyboard kids- i’m in writer meetings all day

emmyc:

hayoubi:

drawbrandondraw:

hayoubi:

portrait of the artist on a thursday morning

GO BACK TO OHIO BRANDON. SO I CAN TURN THIS OFFICE INTO MY NAPPING CHAMBER

hehehheh chuuumps. I bet you’re wearing SHOES right now like IDIOTS. *works from home*

lucky storyboard kids- i’m in writer meetings all day

m0thbutt asked: You're probably asked this a lot, but what kind of things do you put in your portfolio to show people? I imagine a lot of basic things but what kind of things to do put in there to show your personal style?

I guess it depends on what it’s for!

If you’re applying to art schools I think they like seeing a lot of drawings from life? I’m not an expert on that~

If it’s for jobs I use my tumblr as a portfolio! All the work you see here is what I’ve submitted to get jobs or it’s what other people have seen and hired me based on the work.

I’m not too great with knowing what goes in a portfolio though, maybe someone else has some tips??

adamsarjeant asked: I don't know if you have any experience with this, but here goes, homes. I'm in my first year of an illustration degree, and trying to work as often and as hard as I can, but because of temporary vestibular damage (hopefully it should heal in about half a year) I experience long periods of dizziness where it's hard to work. I've been trying to do all the work I need to do to be as good as I need to be, but I just can't seem to. I'm an older student (~25), so the pressure is super on. Any tips?

I think the first tip would be to not factor in your age at all! Age in a Creative field doesn’t matter, drive and determination does! Some people start young, some people start well after they’ve retired and had a couple of grandchildren. 

YOU more than anyone know what your limits are when it comes to how much you can work and still feel ok, do your best and don’t compare yourself to anyone else in your class. It may take you a little longer to work but there’s nothing wrong with that!

Here is my #witchsona for #witchweek!
When I laugh my friend Matt says it sounds like a Mushroom Witch! So that is who I am!
Weeeeeee

Here is my #witchsona for #witchweek!

When I laugh my friend Matt says it sounds like a Mushroom Witch! So that is who I am!

Weeeeeee

I finished my work early today so I’ve been treating myself by making little sprites!

I finished my work early today so I’ve been treating myself by making little sprites!

Here is a comic!

elignome asked: Hey Madeleine! I think that advices you give are really helpful, so i've decided to ask you smthn. I'm self taught and now i'm applying to art school. I draw for 6-7 hours a day and i really try to push my limits, however i'm worried about the fact that i've never been taught by a professional artist. I want to study character animation! Can you please tell me if it's even possible for a self taught guy to become a storyboard artist or character designer in the industry?btw love your work!

anything is possible! BUT you are going to have to compete with all the people who have had professional training and schooling and experience,soo you have to push yourself about a million times more than those people!

You may draw 6-7 hours a day but someone else is drawing 8-9 hours, so you have to draw 10 hours! Find out what assignments Animation students are being given (I used to google CalArts assignments!) and do them, give yourself projects, give yourself deadlines. When you’re not drawing you should try to study films and stories, go to lectures, go to workshops- if you can’t afford to travel watch them on Youtube!

memoircomics asked: I'm completely self taught and just now applying to art school and I stopped in on a Disney story recruitment just to see what they'd say about me and they pretty much ripped me apart and were really annoyed with me for coming in, but they said that I have some minor potential. This was my first attempt and my first rejection and I am not sure how to feel now. Maybe excited that I got it out of the way? How do you keep these things from discouraging you?

well good job putting yourself out there! it’s super scary D: 

How do you keep rejection from discouraging you?Well first I usually feel sad for an hour, but then I get all puffy like ‘they rejected me? well then I’ll get so good that next time they’ll come after me and i’ll reject them! YEAH YEAH!’ then I go to full on Draw 24/7 mode! YEAH!

Listen to whatever notes they gave you, focus on your weakness and keep beefing up your strong points! 

Get reviewed by as many people as you can! There are some conventions that have specific portfolio review slots that you can sign up for! Listen to advice, ask questions, keep working and never take a bad review or rejection as an attack on you personally!